March 26th, 2007

  • evan

whim

xmonad : a lightweight X11 window manager, written in Haskell. I think these "[x], but written in [yr favorite programming language]" projects aren't especially news-worthy (or for that matter attention-worthy), but it's neat to see it's based on / influenced by dwm: because, as yet another learning-Haskell project, I too wrote a window manager in Haskell that was based on dwm.

Mine didn't do too much. I don't think I posted about it here 'cause I was a little ashamed of doing it; it's not like the world especially needs another window manager.

(Haskell geeks only for this part:) That project mostly made me conclude that IO-intensive apps like window managers are sort of a pain. Their code (which uses a state monad to track the state of the world) has chunks of line after line of "gets"es. In one sense it doesn't really matter and is just more typing to get things done, but in another sense so is Java.
  • evan

post on reddit

My previous post was apparently on reddit. I especially appreciate negative comments because I get those pretty rarely, and I usually learn the most through them (though it still stings whenever they're actually correct). I sorta wish I hadn't dropped the G-bomb, as it wasn't especially pertinent to my post and that's what most people seized upon. (A similar phenomenon: I always feel bad for people working at cool stuff at "unpopular" companies like Microsoft because even when they release something neat it's always spun in a negative way.)

In that post I was particularly trying to highlight that I previously had held some belief ("having people review your code before checking it in would be a big waste of time") and that this belief turned out to be wrong. There's some irony in this showing up on reddit because those sorts of sites are primarily oriented towards letting people reinforce their existing beliefs*.

I'm a little bummed out on reddit in general because while I do want the sort of content they purport to seek (and for some reason I keep going back, despite it seeming worse each time), I know in my heart that the premise is fundamentally flawed.


* E.g., Republicans are bad, Haskell/Erlang/Lisp is good, Vista is bad, Paul Graham is smart, Americans are stupid, etc.